The World According to ChickLitGurrl™

Where the WORD is IT :: Editorial/Writing Assistance offered by author, editor, educator Shōn Bacon

Author Donald Peebles, Jr. Talks Street/Urban Fic @ AtBaP February 28, 2009

Filed under: All the Blog's a Page,Author Interviews — Shon @ 11:14 pm

For the month of February, All the Blog’s a Page (AtBaP) is taking it to the streets – urban and street fiction, that is.

We have a special addition to our February round-up features: Donald Peebles, Jr., author of Hidden Fires!

For February, I asked the following set of questions:

**What does urban/street fiction mean to you? Is there a distinction between urban and street?
**Of all the genres present, what drew you to write urban/street fiction?
**What has been – if any – some of the positive and negative comments you have received from readers?
**In the branch of Black literature, what do you think urban/street fiction brings to the table?

In answering the question, In the branch of Black literature, what do you think urban/street fiction brings to the table, Peebles stated, “I think urban/street fiction brings to the table into the branch of Black literature a more realistic lens into the Black experience. Blacks are people who have different experiences, cultural expressions, and histories. Urban/street fiction is just another sum of the whole of Black literature. It brings forth the perspectives of the working-class, pimps, madams, prostitutes, addicts, pushers, dealers. hustlers, kingpins, czars, gangstas, homothugs, lesbian AGs (Aggressors), swingers, sexual freaks, nymphomanics, stick-up kids, and other klnds of people whose testimonies are not told by the upper-and-middle-class Black Bourgeoisie, the BAPS, the Buppies, and the Black Bohemians who feel that Blacks still need to write books which will be accepted by the mainstream in order to be on the New York Times bestseller list.”

To read the rest of Donald Peebles, Jr.’s thoughts on street/urban fiction, head to All the Blog’s a Page!

ALL THE BLOG’S A PAGE (AtBaP) – Where everything relates to writing

[http://alltheblogsapage.blogspot.com]

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Do writers “starve” because they fail to help other writers?

Filed under: Shon Bacon,The Blood-Red Pencil,the writing life — Shon @ 4:22 pm

Read my thoughts on The Blood-Red Pencil today – {http://bloodredpencil.blogspot.com}

 

Do Some Writers Deserve to Starve? February 27, 2009

Filed under: Shon Bacon,The Blood-Red Pencil,the writing life — Shon @ 2:29 pm

I use Elaura Niles’ book, SOME WRITERS DESERVE TO STARVE, to help answer this question in a three-part series on the popular blog, THE BLOOD-RED PENCIL [link].

Head to The BRP to see part one and two on this question. Check out why it’s important for writers to know their book better than ANYONE (part one) and why it’s important to write THE NEXT BOOK (part two)!

Part Three is TOMORROW!

The Blood-Red Pencil [link]

 

Get Lost in Author Sandy Lo and Her Debut Novel, LOST IN YOU

Filed under: Author Interviews,chicklitgurrl,Shon Bacon — Shon @ 1:33 pm

Get Lost in Author Sandy Lo and Her Debut Novel, LOST IN YOU: Interview

About Lost in You:

Cooper Jackson is a twenty-five year old woman, who shuts down in relationships. Burdened by her mother’s failed love life and her untimely death, Cooper won’t allow her heart to get broken, or stolen, either. A chance meeting with a famous singer, Ryan Latham could change Cooper forever. She finds herself wanting to give her heart to Ryan…one problem: he’s engaged. To divert her attention, Cooper throws herself into a relationship with Ryan’s best friend, JT, a man just as unstable as she is. Lost In You is a coming of age love story for a slightly older generation; it’s about finding yourself, overcoming your past, and building a future.

INTERVIEW EXCERPT

CLG: You’re strutting down the street – sexy, happy, and confident – what song is playing in your mind?
SL: “These Boots Are Made For Walking” by Jessica Simpson

CLG: Do you have a standard process to your writing? Are you a plotter or a pantser?
SL: I’m definitely more of a pantser. I could get the smallest idea for a story and just go with it. I’ll admit, it’s not very conventional or easy at times, but it works best for me. I have tried outlining and by the time I’m finished outlining everything, I either wind up straying from the plan anyway or get bored with the storyline altogether.

CLG: What are you doing to promote and market LOST IN YOU?
SL: I have been doing interviews with various newspapers, websites and magazines. I’ve also been promoting myself on Facebook and MySpace as well as setting up fan chats. In April, I will be doing a book signing at Barnes & Noble in my hometown of Staten Island, NY, so I’m really excited about that. Word of mouth has been very helpful thanks to my friends and family who have been spreading the word. Also, running my own magazine helps since celebrities have been nice enough to take pictures with LOST IN YOU.

Check out the rest of Sandy Lo’s interview @ ChickLitGurrl: high on LATTES & WRITING!

ChickLitGurrl: high on LATTES & WRITING
Chocolate-caramel lattes + Women writers = ONE GREAT TIME!
[chicklitgurrl.blogspot.com]

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Do some writers deserve to starve? February 26, 2009

Filed under: The Blood-Red Pencil — Shon @ 6:31 pm

@ The Blood-Red Pencil, read part one of my response to this question and to why you should know your book better than everyone – [link]

 

Author/Pubber Markeise Washington on Urban/Street Fic @ AtBaP

Filed under: Uncategorized — Shon @ 11:28 am

For the month of February, All the Blog’s a Page (AtBaP) is taking it to the streets – urban and street fiction, that is.

We conclude our features on urban/street fiction with Markeise Q. Washington, author of Entrepreneur and owner of 5ive Star Publications!

For February, I asked the following set of questions:

**What does urban/street fiction mean to you? Is there a distinction between urban and street?
**Of all the genres present, what drew you to write urban/street fiction?
**What has been – if any – some of the positive and negative comments you have received from readers?
**In the branch of Black literature, what do you think urban/street fiction brings to the table?

In answering the question, What does urban/street fiction mean to you? Is there a distinction between urban and street, Washingston stated, “There has been so much debate over these two little words that it’s utterly ridiculous. I hate that we get put in a category, period. I was in Borders the other day looking for the African-American section. The reason I couldn’t find it was the black slots that say African American were taken down. I guess they classify street as dealing with drugs, prostitution, hustling, slang, etc. Any neighborhood can be considered urban. Here’s the definition- “characteristic of or accustomed to cities; citified.” So that means anybody that has lived in a city for a period of time is-you guessed it-urban. To me there is no distinction because literature is literature. Another thing that bothers me is that question that black authors get asked: “Do you plan to write that genre forever?” It has yet to be answered honestly. I haven’t heard an author say well no I plan to write street lit until my arm falls off. Authors should write what makes them happy and hope they build a fan base that sticks with them. I don’t want to read a romance novel by Teri Woods. I love the style she already has.”

To read the rest of Markeise Q. Washington’s thoughts on street/urban fiction and to read an excerpt from Entrepreneur, head to All the Blog’s a Page!

ALL THE BLOG’S A PAGE (AtBaP) – Where everything relates to writing
[http://alltheblogsapage.blogspot.com]

 

CLG Talks with Indie Publisher/Author Barbara Joe Williams February 22, 2009

ChickLitGurrl Talks to indie publisher/author Barbara Joe Williams!

INTERVIEW EXCERPT

CLG: If you had to define yourself as a writer, how would you do so?

BJW: I would define myself as a passionate writer. In other words, I only write about the things that I feel passionately about whether it’s fiction or nonfiction.

CLG: How do the books you’ve written connect to your definition?

BJW: All of my books feature strong willed characters who are determined to succeed in life. I write about people falling in love, dealing with hardships, and going through life changing experiences in a positive manner. I show people with a thirst for living and a passion for overcoming whatever obstacles they face.

CLG: How have you promoted your works?

BJW: I’ve tried many avenues for promoting my work nationally by using the Internet and traveling to different cities. I’ve joined many online book clubs and networking groups. In addition, I conduct writing, publishing, and marketing workshops at various conferences, libraries, and universities. I’ve been interviewed on the radio, newspaper, and television. Recently, I started a local authors network, and I’m the annual host for the Local African-American Authors Day program in February. All of these avenues give me exposure and promote my work.

Check out the rest of Barbara Joe Williams’ interview @ ChickLitGurrl: high on LATTES & WRITING!

ChickLitGurrl: high on LATTES & WRITING

Chocolate-caramel lattes + Women writers = ONE GREAT TIME!

[chicklitgurrl.blogspot.com]

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