The World According to ChickLitGurrl™

Where the WORD is IT :: Editorial/Writing Assistance offered by author, editor, educator Shōn Bacon

Screenwriting + Pure Hilarity = Brian Spaeth March 16, 2009

Filed under: All the Blog's a Page — Shon @ 10:12 am
Tags: , ,

For the month of March, All the Blog’s a Page (AtBaP) is going to the big screen…and center stage as we talk to screenwriters and playwrights!

Last month, the hilarious and talented writer Brian Spaeth came to AtBaP for an interview, and this month he’s back to talk about screenwriting and the upcoming project 2WO G2N G2Y!

LATEST PROJECT: 2WO G2N G2Y


2WO G2N G2Y tells the story of a man with no memory, no name, and two guns.

Embroiled in an international revenge plot between a pair of secret, international revenge seeking organizations, who are international and want revenge, he must rely on the only things that his body remembers how to do – be really tough and use two guns at once.

He wears four belts.

2WO G2N G2Y is a 30-part web series, which is made exclusively to be online, on the internet. Told in 30 parts, it’s for the web. It’s broadband, how you like it – online.

What does it all mean? The internet is officially on fire. More on fire than anything as ever been ever.

Check out the trailer!

For the month of March, I asked SEVERAL questions. When I asked, What three things should writers/filmmakers have in their arsenal if they want to heighten their chances of success, Spaeth replied:


a) Multiple Ideas – You need to be seen as an ongoing revenue stream for anyone you’re working with, i.e. agents, producers, etc., and also – sometimes the throw-away idea you think is garbage might be the one someone else sees as gold.

b) Humility/Muzzle – Know when to shut up and listen, even when the person talking to you has no idea what they’re talking about. Telling them they’re an imbecile does you know favors, and nobody likes a pretentious artist.

c) Knowledge – Read as much as you can about the business, so you understand how it works. Go to the WGA website and read the sample contracts if you’ve never seen one. Follow box office and know what kinds of material the industry will be looking for. Research agents or producers before you meet/contact them. Watch old movies – have a working knowledge of film history.

To read the rest of Brian Spaeth’s comments on screenwriting, head to All the Blog’s a Page!

And while there, check out writers Kristin Johnson’s and John W. Bosley’s wonderful features!

ALL THE BLOG’S A PAGE (AtBaP) – Where everything relates to writing
[http://alltheblogsapage.blogspot.com]

Advertisements
 

Dotcomers.tv’s Kristin Johnson on Writing across Media March 9, 2009

Filed under: All the Blog's a Page,Author Interviews — Shon @ 8:12 am

For the month of March, All the Blog’s a Page (AtBaP) is going to the big screen…and center stage as we talk to screenwriters and playwrights!

I’m excited to have writer of all trades Kristin Johnson @ AtBaP! This week, she writes about writing across the media and her project, Dotcomers! If you are a writer interested in screenwriting…or in any creative writing, you owe it to yourself to read the entire feature @ AtBaP!

About Dotcomers

Teenage waitress Honey Dee battles the greedy, slick, corrupt businessman Dubious Diction, who owns her hometown of Greedville. She creates Dotcomers Café, the main setting for the series, and inspires the cast of quirky eccentric characters to resist Dubious.

“Dotcomers” is a creative blend of today’s edgy, satirical cartoons and yesterday’s zany, classic toons; that means its appeal is…we can almost hear Yogi Bear saying this…broader than the average cartoon!

Dotcomers explores the culture of social-networking entrepreneurs who don’t wait around for a bailout to solve their problems. They fight the old corrupt system, represented by greedy Dubious Diction, which is open to excess. Although they are quirky and they clash on more than one occasion, Dotcomers represent the best of the Internet culture, and Honey Dee, founder of the Dotcomers Cafe, is a female role model who uses her mind and common sense to make a difference in the world.

For the month of March, I asked my featured panelists SEVERAL QUESTIONS. When answering the question, What similarities, things no matter the medium, are important for a good story to be told, Johnson stated, “The commandment of “Thou Shalt Not Bore Thy Audience” is still valid no matter what the medium. I don’t mean that you have to have nonstop violence or sex, since many people, myself included, find *those* boring.

You have to care about the characters. “WALL-E” connected with audiences because, even though many people (including my movie buff friends) found the notion of a fat, childlike future population and a destroyed Earth depressing, you still cared about that cute robot. “Slumdog Millionaire” had depressing elements such as cutting out street kids’ eyes to make them more sympathetic and earn more begging money for the gang lords, but in an economy that gives us nothing but bad news, we love the idea that people can improve their circumstances. “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” suspends disbelief and gives us a great love story.

Similarly, Richard LaGravenese made people care as much about the romance in the movie “The Bridges of Madison County” as people did in the book. The images were visual poetry.”Gone With The Wind” was so powerful as a book that people forgot the changes of their world and experienced the changes of the Old South, and they immediately cast Clark Gable as Rhett Butler. The movie did justice to the book because it captured the essence of Scarlett and Rhett and Tara without getting bogged down in details. How many people find it impossible to forget the image of Scarlett in shadow?

And two words: Harry Potter. Take an orphaned kid who turns out to be a wizard, and finds just as much trouble in his new life as in the old, but with more joy and a sense of purpose, give him a monumental challenge and a fascinating world to play in, and the result is gold.

You have to touch your audience. Make them laugh, make them think, shift them from their reality.”

To read the rest of Kristin Johnson’s wonderful comments about writing across the media, head to All the Blog’s a Page!

And while there, check out John W. Bosley, writer/producer/director of AMNESIA, as he talks about screenwriting!

ALL THE BLOG’S A PAGE (AtBaP) – Where everything relates to writing
[http://alltheblogsapage.blogspot.com]

 

Writer, Director, Producer John W. Bosley on Writing, Movies, & Amnesia March 2, 2009

Filed under: All the Blog's a Page — Shon @ 10:43 am

For the month of March, All the Blog’s a Page (AtBaP) is going to the big screen…and center stage as we talk to screenwriters and playwrights!

First up is writer, director, and producer John W. Bosley, who talks to us about writing and his movie, The Allan Carter Saga Part I: amnesia!

About The Allan Carter Saga Part I: amnesia

Allan Carter wakes up with amnesia .  Only one thought drives him forward: “I have to find my family!”  He finds himself being shot at, hiding in caves and secret tunnels, and being chased through the forest while constantly searching for the truth.  What kind of world did he wake up to?  And, what really happened to his family?

In answering the question, What similarities, things no matter the medium, are important for a good story to be told, Bosley stated, “An “inciting incident” which poses a question like: damsel in distress, will the hero save her? Then a conclusion to the question which in that case is either a yes or no. There also needs to be a depth to the relationships and it needs to deal with some of the universal questions that people deal with around the world. There are so many deep questions people have. A good story should dig into the souls of the audience and awaken some feelings they have about the issues.”

To read the rest of John W. Bosley’s thoughts on scriptwriting and movies, head to All the Blog’s a Page!

ALL THE BLOG’S A PAGE (AtBaP) – Where everything relates to writing[http://alltheblogsapage.blogspot.com]

 

Author Donald Peebles, Jr. Talks Street/Urban Fic @ AtBaP February 28, 2009

Filed under: All the Blog's a Page,Author Interviews — Shon @ 11:14 pm

For the month of February, All the Blog’s a Page (AtBaP) is taking it to the streets – urban and street fiction, that is.

We have a special addition to our February round-up features: Donald Peebles, Jr., author of Hidden Fires!

For February, I asked the following set of questions:

**What does urban/street fiction mean to you? Is there a distinction between urban and street?
**Of all the genres present, what drew you to write urban/street fiction?
**What has been – if any – some of the positive and negative comments you have received from readers?
**In the branch of Black literature, what do you think urban/street fiction brings to the table?

In answering the question, In the branch of Black literature, what do you think urban/street fiction brings to the table, Peebles stated, “I think urban/street fiction brings to the table into the branch of Black literature a more realistic lens into the Black experience. Blacks are people who have different experiences, cultural expressions, and histories. Urban/street fiction is just another sum of the whole of Black literature. It brings forth the perspectives of the working-class, pimps, madams, prostitutes, addicts, pushers, dealers. hustlers, kingpins, czars, gangstas, homothugs, lesbian AGs (Aggressors), swingers, sexual freaks, nymphomanics, stick-up kids, and other klnds of people whose testimonies are not told by the upper-and-middle-class Black Bourgeoisie, the BAPS, the Buppies, and the Black Bohemians who feel that Blacks still need to write books which will be accepted by the mainstream in order to be on the New York Times bestseller list.”

To read the rest of Donald Peebles, Jr.’s thoughts on street/urban fiction, head to All the Blog’s a Page!

ALL THE BLOG’S A PAGE (AtBaP) – Where everything relates to writing

[http://alltheblogsapage.blogspot.com]

 

Author Terra Little Talks about Street/Urban Fic Today! February 19, 2009

Filed under: All the Blog's a Page — Shon @ 8:34 am
Tags: , , ,

For the month of February, All the Blog’s a Page (AtBaP) is taking it to the streets – urban and street fiction, that is. This week, I feature Terra Little, author of Where There’s Smoke, and trust me, she has some things to say about this genre!

For February, I asked the following set of questions:

**What does urban/street fiction mean to you? Is there a distinction between urban and street?
**Of all the genres present, what drew you to write urban/street fiction?
**What has been – if any – some of the positive and negative comments you have received from readers?
**In the branch of Black literature, what do you think urban/street fiction brings to the table?

In answering the question, In the branch of Black literature, what do you think urban/street fiction brings to the table, Little began her response by stating, “As a combined genre, which I don’t happen to think is always the case, Urban/Street Fiction brings confusion and, in some cases, anger to the table. There are truly urban, working class people who take offense at being perceived as having anything to do with street life by society’s standards, myself included. And there are those who are confused about what it means to be urban and what it means to be street; those who think one is unequivocally the same as the other. Along this vein, I think Urban/Street Fiction can bring stereotypical fuel to the table. We can all eat at the same table, but let’s not confuse corn with mashed potatoes, even if mashed potatoes is capable of covering up corn when we want them to.”

To read the rest of Terra Little’s thoughts on street/urban fiction and to read an excerpt from Where There’s Smoke, head to All the Blog’s a Page!

ALL THE BLOG’S A PAGE (AtBaP) – Where everything relates to writing
[http://alltheblogsapage.blogspot.com]

 

Writer Brian Spaeth Talks Writing, Movies, and Airplanes! February 15, 2009

Filed under: All the Blog's a Page — Shon @ 11:07 pm

Over at All the Blog’s a Page [link], I have a special feature with writer Brian Spaeth, author of Prelude to a Super Airplane!

My interview with Brian was probably one of my most favorite as he is hilarious and you never quite know if he’s pulling your leg or not! During the interview, we talk about writing, movies, and of course, AIRPLANES.

About Prelude: In the year 2012, These United States of America is politically divided to a degree not seen since the Civil War. On one side stands the fast emerging pro-flying car contingent; on the other, the stubborn and traditional pro-airplane members of the populace. At stake? The entire future of airborne leisure and transportation.

Set against this tumultuous backdrop, a young screenwriter has written a book about the only thing that can save the airplane riding industry – an impossible to conceive, 47-story airplane of such power and wonder, the world will have no choice but to submit to its glory.

The world’s first comedy/political thriller/mystery/drama/romance/action/adventure/science fiction/showbiz insider/horror/family/energy drink industry insider/holiday/autobiography, Prelude to a Super Airplane weaves the lives and destinies of 40 people together in astounding and unexpected ways, as they all find themselves facing the future of airplane riding…the Super Airplane.

Here’s an excerpt from the interview…

CLG: I can’t even start this interview the way I would do most because your book truly is out of the ordinary – but in a good way, LOL The back cover of your book – PRELUDE TO A SUPER AIRPLANE – offers the story of how this book came to be, but I’m not sure it’s completely true…or is it? Tell us how this novel idea came to you.
BS: The entire thing is fictional, but there are HEAVY layers of truth throughout. My parents really did own a chain of high-end retail furniture stores, for example. Certain elements of my brother are accurate, although he doesn’t work for the government. The second-to-last “deleted scene” is so true I almost didn’t include it. My “character” – that’s pretty much me. Everything with Jennifer is based on a real experience, minus the curse.

As to how this came to me, two days before Thanksgiving 2008, I woke up in the middle of the night, and Prelude to a Super Airplane was more or less fully formed in my head. Obviously it evolved, but the big picture just kinda appeared out of nowhere.

CLG: What are you doing as an author to promote PRELUDE?
BS: I just wrote a post about this on my site where I go into more detail, but for me, it’s basically about building awareness of my blog, on which I write irreverent nonsense every day. If people like my site, they’ll like the book. If they stick around long enough, they’ll buy the book.

In addition to that, I’ve put it out for some reviews in various places, and am doing the occasional interview with nice people, like what’s happening right in this sentence.

I’m avoiding the HARD SELL, because I just think it’s a bad vibe in 2009. I’ve made the first 55 pages available as a free download, with more to come.

I’m also writing what might be called a spin-off or companion book that I’ll be giving away in whole as a free e-book. It’ll also be available as a paperback through Amazon.

CLG: As mentioned earlier, you are a screenwriter. Talk to us about your screenwriting journey – what has been some of the highlights?

BS: The absolute highlight was being able to get my first feature produced, Who Shot Mamba?. As a bonus, to have it come out good was phenomenal. It was a battle to get done, and there were plenty of times any sane person would’ve given up.

I mean, other than that, there are a ton of highs and lows. The second week I was in LA, somehow I was pitching a movie to one of the producers of Forrest Gump. I was sure I had made it, right? That didn’t work out.

When I got my first agent was cool. Then the second agent was less so. The third one you realize you’re gonna be doing as much for yourself as they are, so the coolness wears off.

The lowlights are any of the times you talk to your friends who are lawyers and/or other successful things, and get those brief moments of self-doubt.

Overall, I’m one of those people who will never be satisfied, so I really don’t get too high or too low. Not that I don’t love the book to death, but already I’m kinda like, “Well, I wrote a book. That was fun – what’s next?”

Head to All the Blog’s a Page [link] to read the rest of my interview with Brian Spaeth!

 

Author Teresa Patterson Talks Street/Urban Fic Today @ AtBaP February 5, 2009

For the month of February, All the Blog’s a Page (AtBaP) is taking it to the streets – urban and street fiction, that is. Up first is Teresa Patterson, author of the latest, Ex-Boyfriend!

For February, I asked the following set of questions:

**What does urban/street fiction mean to you? Is there a distinction between urban and street?

**Of all the genres present, what drew you to write urban/street fiction?

**What has been – if any – some of the positive and negative comments you have received from readers?

**In the branch of Black literature, what do you think urban/street fiction brings to the table?

In answering the question, In the branch of Black literature, what do you think urban/street fiction brings to the table, Patterson replied, “I think urban/street fiction brings so much to the table for both the African American authors and the readers. Along with the newer “street” genre, came the opportunity for so many authors to put pen to paper and create. Before, they may have thought that no one would be interested in what they’d written, but times have changed. Today, if you write it and publish it, somebody is going to buy it and read it.

When once there were only a few African American titles to choose from now there are a variety of books on the bookshelves written by black authors. Urban/street fiction appeals to a lot of the younger generation. They may not necessarily have read much in the past, but now they can pick up something that they can relate to.”

To read the rest of Teresa Patterson’s thoughts on street/urban fiction and to read an excerpt from Ex-Boyfriend, head to All the Blog’s a Page!

ALL THE BLOG’S A PAGE (AtBaP) – Where everything relates to writing
[http://alltheblogsapage.blogspot.com]